Beer Battered Tilapia with Mandarin Oranges

After making deep-fried milanesa tilapia, I swore I would become more conscious about my health and avoid fried food.  I really should know better than to speak in absolutes, but I have no regrets.  After all, home made food is good for you, right?

This was a surprisingly fast and easy recipe to make.  15 minutes tops I’d say between prep work and cooking.  This is great because it means we have more time to watch Big Bang Theory and Iron Chef.  Tonks and I have steadily been working our way through various series, most recently having finished Star Wars (Tonks had somehow never seen it).  Priceless moment occurred when General Grevious was killed by Obi-Wan and Tonk’s response was: “He should’ve made a Horcrux”.  Yes, around here horcruxes are perfectly acceptable life elongation objects.  But back to the recipe.  My only recommendation is that when you serve the sauce with the fish, keep it with you as a dipping sauce rather than pouring it over.  The sauce was delicious, but made the fish a little soggy after soaking it for a while.

Beer Battered Tilapia with Mandarin Oranges
adapted from Robin Miller

4 Tilapia Fillets
1/2 + 1/4 cup Flour
2/3 cup Beer (we used lime beer)
1 Egg
1  1/2 teaspoons Baking Powder
Salt
Freshly Ground Pepper
Vegetable Oil
2 tbsp Lime Juice
2 tsp Tomato Sauce
1 tsp Thyme
11 oz can of Mandarin Oranges

Place 1/4 cup of flour in a plate for breading.  In a wide bowl, whisk 1/2 cup of flour, beer, and egg.  Season each tilapia with salt and pepper, then coat both sides with flour and dunk the tilapia into batter.

Pour about half an inch of oil into pan and heat it to medium-high.  When the oil begins sizzling, cook the tilapia on both sides until they are golden and crispy (about 2-5 minutes per side).

Mix the lime juice, tomato sauce, thyme and in a small bowl.  Drain the mandarin oranges, but don’t rinse them, and add to the bowl.  Serve with the tilapia.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Little Italy in Thailand « The Kitchen of Requirement

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