Bread Pudding with Vanilla Sauce

It was 10 o’clock at night and I had to listen to my tummy, the block of hardened Ciabatta lying on top of my toaster, and my homework sitting pathetically on the living room floor. Thus, I decided as a responsible college student enrolled in summer school, it was completely logical to not suppress the urge to make bread pudding with vanilla sauce.

I mean, you can’t work on a disgruntle stomach – right? Tell me otherwise. I dare you.
Without further ado, I humbly present my first entry onto The Kitchen of Requirement!

There are two things concerning this recipe that I’d like to highlight:
1) The Old Bread and Butter Ratio.
The story of ‘the block of hardened Ciabatta’ begins four days ago. During a morning rush to class in a haze of sleepy stupor, Minerva and I left our precious loaf of Ciabatta in a large plastic bag to keep fresh on top of my toaster. Unfortunately, while toasting bread for breakfast, the plastic bag melted from the heat radiating off the toaster. Thus, our precious Ciabatta turned into a rock (had Dobby actually bewitched our Ciabatta instead of an actual bludger, he may have killed Harry during his second year). Taking into account that our Ciabatta was now a stationary bludger, I poured more than enough butter onto the bread pieces to soften them up. If your bread pieces are a bit softer than a bludger, please feel free to use less butter. But honestly people, who doesn’t love more butter? Anyone? Good, that’s what I thought.


2) How To Temper 101
To all the kids, elves, werewolves, centaurs, goblins, witches, and squibs in the world, tempering is not hard to do. Yes, it has more than four letters but I promise you – even Mr. Filch will be able to temper eggs by the end of this bullet point. Tempering is the act of mixing a hot liquid (usually dairy based) with eggs. The trick is to do it in stages so that you avoid making scrambled eggs. By mixing the hot liquid with the eggs in stages, you are lulling the eggs to adjust to the temperature of the hot liquid and not curdle into solids upon contact. The secret is to simply take a soup ladle and slowly pour the hot liquid into the eggs while quickly whisking the mixture with your other hand. That’s it. See, even Mr. Filch could do it!

On an updated note, this recipe is absolutely divine with butter pecan ice cream.

[M: I’ve had this pretty much every day for breakfast with dessert.  It’s become a staple in my diet so now that I’ve eaten the last of it I’m at a loss of what to eat.  There are no munchies in the apartment! Oh the horror!!]

Bread Pudding
Adapted from: allrecipes.com

9 slices of old bread
¾ cup of butter (melted)
4 beaten eggs
2 cups of Half & Half
¾ cup of white sugar
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp vanilla extract
½ cup of pecans
Honey

Preheat the oven to 350° degrees.
Break bread into small pieces and place into baking pan.
Drizzle melted butter over bread and leave soaking until bread is soft.
During this time, combine eggs, half & half, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla in a bowl. Beat until well mixed and pour over bread mix. Make sure all of the bread is covered – especially the crust.
Leave soaking for 45 minutes.
Crush pecans and sprinkle them over bread pudding. Drizzle honey on top of crushed pecans.
Place baking pan in oven and cook for 40 min.

Vanilla Sauce
Adapted from: allrecipes.com

¾ cups of heavy cream
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 egg yolk
3 tbsp sugar

Heat heavy cream and vanilla extract in a sauce pan.
Wisk egg yolks and sugar together.
Temper the cream and vanilla mixture with the egg yolks and sugar.
Continue whisking over low heat.

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